Close
  Chat

Child and Adolescent Mental Health


Parents and teachers: Work together to identify learning disorders in kids and help them learn, live well

Learning disorders usually present in children at a young age. However, that doesn’t always mean that a diagnosis will be provided promptly. Often, parents wonder if their child’s delays or behaviors are normal (because what’s normal, anyhow?) or think they’ll “grow out of it.” Fortunately, there are other key figures…

Why does giving cash to parents help children’s brains?

A recent study showed a connection between monthly cash gifts to low-income mothers and enhanced cognitive development in their infants. Financial well-being can contribute to healthy development in children by alleviating parental stress and the cognitive effects of toxic stress.  Children who experience toxic stress are at increased risk for…

Understanding dysgraphia: Handwriting issues in the digital age

Handwriting skills are still important for cognitive development and academic success even in the digital age, so kids with dysgraphia remain at a disadvantage. Dysgraphia is a specific learning disorder (SLD) with many comorbid presentations.  Symptoms of dysgraphia include impairment in writing ability and writing skills as well as problems…

Grief camp for kids: Helping children find the sun after enormous loss

Because children grieve differently from adults, they can benefit from bereavement support tailored to their specific needs.  Grief camps for kids help children process grief and loss through group and one-on-one counseling, yes, but also through play and art.  You can observe the power of children’s grief camps in the…

Past-life memories in young kids: Does child reincarnation hold up?

A division of the School of Medicine at the University of Virginia has conducted extensive research into the “past life memories” of children. These spontaneous child “reincarnation” stories usually have elements in common, like the violent death of the previous personality and intense emotions.  Some critics use psychological explanations like…

Exceptional, not disordered: How we can all help neurodiverse children belong 

Neurodiversity is a term coined by sociologist Judy Singer to refer to natural variations in the human brain, driven by epigenetics.  The neurodiversity movement rejects the idea that people with ADHD, autism, and other neurodevelopmental conditions are somehow defective. As a society we need to value and accommodate neurodiverse children…

Join the movement — gain access to expert mental health tips and discussions, delivered directly to your inbox.