Therapy to Support Victims of Domestic Violence—Counseling in Cumming, GA

Big Little Lies has become a phenomenon, and this best-seller and HBO series has accomplished more than thrills for its audience. Laine Moriarty’s storyline highlights an important but hidden problem: domestic violence.

(Caution: small spoilers ahead!)

Celeste White is one of the main characters and a mother of kindergarten boys. Every other kindergarten mother is jealous of her fairytale life. Celeste seemingly has everything she could have ever imagined: beauty, comfort, children, romance, friends, money, and more. But if people knew the reality of Celeste’s home life, they would never choose her place. Celeste’s husband is violent with her.

Celeste, talks to herself, wondering about her experiences, “I don’t know why I stay. I don’t know why I deserve this. I don’t know why you do this, why we do this, why this keeps happening.”

Many people who live with domestic violence can relate to Celeste and her experiences. They know that outward appearances do not always match the private reality of a relationship. They also know that escaping domestic violence takes a lot of help—from family, from friends, and from a skilled counselor.

Thriveworks Cumming, GA has counselors who understand the dynamics of domestic violence. They know what it takes to help someone find safety and recover from the trauma of a violent relationship.

Domestic Abuse: A Violent Cycle

In some ways, each victim of domestic abuse faces unique circumstances—the particulars of what their partner demands or what will trigger their partner varies from case to case. But in other ways, domestic violence is almost always the same, or at least, it follows a similar, predictable pattern:

The Honeymoon Phase: Domestic abuse can be so confusing to victims because there are almost always good times—possibly even wonderful, fairytale-like times in the relationship. Victims are always guessing which partner they will meet today: the violent one or the one from their dreams.

The Tension Building Phase: The dream, however, always fades in violent relationships. Tension creeps into daily life, and victims walk on egg shells. They may try to placate the violent partner with the hope of avoid the violence. The violent partner often responds by demanding more and more from the victim.

The Abusive Phase: The violent partner, at any moment, can make a decision to abuse. The abuse may come in the form of verbal, sexual, or physical violence or a combination of the three. Violent partners inevitably try to attribute the abuse to some flaw in the victim, but no one deserves violence, ever.

The cycle could take a few minutes, a few hours, a few days, or a few years. Often, each cycle is more intense than the previous, and the violence escalates over time. During the honeymoon phase, violent partners may swear and cry and promise that they will change, but the cycle rarely ends without significant intervention.

One survivor illustrates what it is like to live in the cycle of violence, “He would be alternately kind and then fly off the handle for no reason. I always lived in fear of his temper. It was very stressful.”

Red Flags for a Violent Relationship


The red flags for a potentially violent relationship almost center around the idea of control: one partner in a relationship want to manipulate or domineer the other. Consider how your current partner behaves. Do any of the following remind you of your partner? Does your partner…

  • Dissuade you from being with family or friends
  • Call you derogatory names (even as “jokes”)
  • Subtly or overtly put you down
  • Attempt to take away your agency (i.e., your ability to make decisions—such as how to spend money, where to go, what to wear, and more)
  • Scare, intimidate, or threaten you
  • Harm you, your kids, or your pets
  • Blame you or others for their behavior
  • Discourage you from working or going to school
  • Force you into sexual acts where you feel unsafe or when you have said, “no”
  • If your partner has said or done things on this list (or anything similar), know that it is not healthy behavior. In fact, these behaviors may be warning signs that your partner could become or possibly already has become violent.

Counseling and Support for Domestic Violence Victims

Thriveworks Cumming, GA offers counseling that has supported and guided many victims of domestic violence. Our counselors understand the dangers that victims face and the dangers of finding safety. They are ready to help support victims as they escape the violent cycle and as they heal from the trauma.

We want our clients to feel how much we care for them from the moment they call our office. That’s why we have a person answer their calls and help them schedule appointments. That’s why we often see first-time clients within 24 hours. It’s why we work with so many insurance companies.

We hope nothing stands in the way of you getting the help—and safety—that you need. Call Thriveworks Cumming, GA today.

Thriveworks Counseling
2450 Atlanta Hwy. #1401-02
Cumming, GA 30040

Tel : (770) 224-7008

Hours:
Mon-Fri: 8AM-9PM
Sat-Sun: 8AM-5PM

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